Sinead O’Connor’s 17-Year-Old Son Found Dead After Going Missing

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Sinead O’Connor is mourning the loss of her 17-year-old son, Shane, after he was found dead in Ireland on Friday.

“My beautiful son, Nevi’im Nesta Ali Shane O’Connor, the very light of my life, decided to end his earthly struggle today and is now with God,” O’Connor wrote in a Tweet posted on Friday evening (January 7th). “May he rest in peace and may no one follow his example. My baby. I love you so much. Please be at peace.”

Shane was O’Connor’s son with Irish folk musician Donald Lunny. He went missing earlier this week — days after he made “two severe suicide attempts,” according to O’Connor.

In a direct plea to her son prior to his body being found, O’Connor wrote on Twitter, “It’s not funny any more all this going missing. You are scaring the crap out of me. Could you please do the right thing and present yourself at a Gardai station. If you are with Shane please call the Gardai for his safety.”

In a follow-up Tweet, she wrote, “Shane, your life is precious. God didn’t chisel that beautiful smile on your beautiful face for nothing. My world would collapse without you. You are my heart. Please don’t stop it from beating. Please don’t harm yourself. Go to the Gardai and let’s get you to hospital.”

O’Connor also expressed her anger at the hospital for allowing her son leave while on suicide watch: “Like, how has a seventeen year old traumatised young person WHO WAS ON SUICIDE WATCH in Tallaght Hosptial’s Lynn Ward been able to go missing???” Hospital of course so far refusing to take any responsibility. Anything happens to my son on their watch? Lawsuits.”

After learning of his passing, O’Connor shared a link to the Bob Marley song “Ride Natty Ride,” writing as a caption, “This is for my Shaney. The light of my life. The lamp of my soul. My blue-eye baby. You will always be my light. We will always be together. No boundary can separate us.”

Anyone in need of help can reach out to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1–800–273–8255 or by visiting SuicidePreventionLifeline.org.





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