Opal Raises $1.8 mln to Allow Enterprises to Better Manage Their Access Policies

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Opal, a software startup based in San Francisco, has secured $1.8 million in seed funding to expand its access management platform.

The funding round was led by Greylock with participation from angel investors like Expanse CEO Tim Junio, Abnormal Security CEO Evan Reiser, and Signal Sciences CEO Andrew Peterson. Saam Motamedi, Partner at Greylock, referred to the firm’s reasons to lead the round by saying:

“Every enterprise knows that managing permissions at scale is challenging. More systems mean more attack vectors, places to audit, and overhead to ensure engineers have the access they need. Opal is tackling these problems with a strong team of security experts, and I look forward to partnering with them on their journey.”

Founded in 2019, Opal is aiming to change how enterprises collect insights and implement remediation policies to better manage access across their digital ecosystems. The startup achieves this via its platform, which offers granular short-lived access, workflow automation, increased security, and access delegation. Eugene Ling, Chief Customer Officer at Opal, said about the platform:

“Opal is built with a delightful web user experience. Employees can make self-serve requests directly out of Slack and resource owners can approve via Slack in one-click. Developers love using our command line interface (CLI) to make requests and start sessions.”

As enterprises continue to migrate their legacy systems toward improved digitized versions, scaling managing access has become an increasing burden for engineering teams. This can not only result in wasting resources that could be allocated elsewhere but also increase the chances of mistakes and errors that could result in catastrophe for an organization.

By streamlining access management for scaling enterprises, Opal believes it can change how different industries deal with access policies forever. This belief is not unfounded, as the startup counts with team members who previously worked for enterprises that faced these same challenges, including Dropbox, Scale, Brex, Mulesoft, and Palo Alto Networks.



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