NASA Webb Telescope references Katy Perry’s hit 2008 song ‘Hot n Cold’ on social media

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NASA Webb Telescope references Katy Perry’s hit 2008 song ‘Hot n Cold’ as $10 billion observatory begins unfolding massive sunshield










Katy Perry was referenced Wednesday on Twitter by NASA Webb Telescope as the $10 billion observatory began to unfurl its massive sunshield.

‘You’re hot and you’re cold…,’ @NASAWebb tweeted along with a musical notes emoji for its roughly 910,000 followers.

The lyrics were referencing Katy’s 2008 hit song ‘Hot n Cold’ from her second album One Of The Boys.

Space telescope: Katy Perry, shown in March 2020 in Australia, was referenced Wednesday on Twitter by NASA Webb Telescope as the $10 billion observatory began to unfurl its massive sunshield

The pop song about a mercurial boyfriend reached number three on the Billboard Hot 100 and was Katy’s second straight top five single after I Kissed A Girl.

Katy, 37, has performed the song on all of her tours and it recently was listed in the sixth slot in the playlist that she shared for her Las Vegas residency Play that kicked off on Wednesday at Resorts World.

NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) just reached a major milestone in its ’29 days on the edge’ journey to its destination in solar orbit with the beginning of the unfolding of its massive sunshield.

‘Our telescope is blooming like a flower in space,’ the US space agency tweeted on Tuesday adding that ‘this marks the start of a major phase to #UnfoldTheUniverse: our sunshield deployment.’

Hit song: 'You’re hot and you’re cold…,' @NASAWebb tweeted along with a musical notes emoji for its roughly 910,000 followers

Hit song: ‘You’re hot and you’re cold…,’ @NASAWebb tweeted along with a musical notes emoji for its roughly 910,000 followers

The unfolding of the sunshine happened soon after the telescope, a joint project between NASA, the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), passed the moon.

The $10 billion stellar observatory is gradually preparing to begin observations, starting in June 2022, by gradually unfolding its antenna, sunshield, and mirror on the way to its final orbit.

The telescope launched on Christmas Day from French Guiana, on an Ariane 5 rocket provided by the European Space Agency, following months of delays to the launch.

Christmas launch: The telescope launched on Christmas Day from French Guiana, on an Ariane 5 rocket provided by the European Space Agency, following months of delays to the launch

Christmas launch: The telescope launched on Christmas Day from French Guiana, on an Ariane 5 rocket provided by the European Space Agency, following months of delays to the launch

It is currently about 42 percent of its way to the second Lagrangian point (L2), an area of balanced gravity between the sun and the Earth, where it will spend more than a decade exploring the universe in infrared.

The sunshield will be deployed gradually over the next several days of the journey and when fully open will be about the same size as a tennis court to protect Webb’s optics from the sun.

The telescope will have a hot and cold side, with the hot side, behind the sunshield, experiencing temperatures up to 185 degrees Fahrenheit – holding a solar panel, communication antenna and a computer.

The cold side of the telescope will be at -388 degrees Fahrenheit, holding the mirrors and science instruments.

The Webb telescope unlike its predecessor the Hubble telescope focuses on infrared wavelengths and takes advantage of advanced mirror technology to peer farther into the cosmos.

Hot and cold: The telescope, shown Saturday in space, will have a hot and cold side, with the hot side, behind the sunshield, experiencing temperatures up to 185 degrees Fahrenheit - holding a solar panel, communication antenna and a computer

Hot and cold: The telescope, shown Saturday in space, will have a hot and cold side, with the hot side, behind the sunshield, experiencing temperatures up to 185 degrees Fahrenheit – holding a solar panel, communication antenna and a computer

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